Run to Remember: update

20140118-144620.jpg

As I write this, we’re well into week 7 of Run to Remember (and if you’re wondering what the hell Run to Remember is, you may have missed this earlier post). This is the first time I’ve done anything for charity, other than that time a couple of years ago when I found a 50 peseta coin and put it straight in a St John Ambulance collection tin without a moments hesitation*. We’re on track to hit our target of £100 per runner (£2600 total) but we need to keep the momentum going, so all donations, big or small, are massively appreciated. For details of how you can help, have a look at our team page at: www.justgiving.com/bedfordshirepoliceruntoremember. Thanks!

No matter how much you love running, if you’re having to do it every single day there’s a danger that it could become a monotonous chore. Luckily, there’s such a fantastic community spirit among the runners from the various teams that motivation is never far away. Speaking of teams, over at Team Bedfordshire we’re a pretty diverse bunch. We have ultra-marathoners, speed snakes, middle-of-the-packers, a talking stegosaurus who grants wishes and a Boston-qualifying running-machine who is currently smashing out 10-20 miles every day. Everyone is making a fantastic effort, but the ones I really have to take my hat off to are the people who, before this all started, were barely on nodding terms with running. There are a few runners on the team who, by taking part in R2R, are more than doubling their weekly mileage. Their shins hurt, their lungs scream, they come back muddy and soaking wet, but they dig deep and they conquer the miles. In time, they may come to love running with a passion, but for now it’s an ordeal, and the important thing is this: They’re not doing it to get fit or to lose weight, they’re not in training for a race, they’re not even doing it as an excuse to wear skintight lycra in public. The reason they’re doing it is to raise money and awareness for a fantastic worthwhile cause. So please help if you can.

Anyway, this is how R2R has been shaping up for me so far…

The good

I’ve found that two miles gives me a great opportunity to concentrate on my running form, and good technique** is now starting to bleed into my longer runs as a result. Since starting, I’ve bagged a half-marathon PB, got my one-mile time down to 6:20 and I’m currently on around 25-30 miles a week. More importantly, I haven’t had any niggles or injuries so far. Fingers crossed it stays that way!

The bad

I still need to structure my week a bit better. The original plan of using a 2 miler as a recovery run every other day (sandwiched between tempo runs, intervals, hills, LSR etc) hasn’t really panned out. When it comes to sticking to a routine, I have all the discipline of a tiny kitten that’s been fed nothing but Lucozade and dolly mixtures for a fortnight. Before R2R started I didn’t think the two miles a day would be too hard, but I’d forgotten one key fact: no matter how far I run, the first two miles is always the hardest.

The ugly

Compared to, for instance, a hard interval session or a long run, I don’t tend to sweat much on the two-milers. That means that I’ve been trying to cut back on laundry by wearing the same kit for two days running. I did try keeping the same stuff on for a third day once, but I quickly found myself being chased by men with sticks and hazmat suits.

Huge thanks to those who have already donated – every penny really is appreciated. And it’s not just about the money either; without your kind words of support and encouragement, this task would have been much much harder. Thanks again folks.

I may have lied about the stegosaurus.

 

 

*I then (quite rightly) spent the next 6 months boasting of my philanthropy. In fact, I think I might still have a few boxes of the commemorative “Jay Cares” T-shirts I got printed up. 
** Okay, gooder technique. I still run with the grace and light-footedness of a broken tractor.
Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Run to Remember: update

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s