Dizzy rascal

For a while now I’ve been looking for my first marathon. A couple of years of running equates to a couple of years of building the marathon up to a mythical status, so it’s only natural that I’m picking my first one with great care.

I want my first time to be special. Fnar.

One that caught my eye was the Northampton Running Festival, which takes place in the beautiful grounds of Delapre Abbey on 31st March.

Nice location? Check.

Local to me? Check.

Hundreds of tiny laps? Check.

That last one is a bit of an exaggeration; it’s actually made up of twelve 3.5km laps. Now, I don’t know about you, but that strikes me as a bit, well, lappy.

So, let’s have a discussion…

How many laps do you think you could break a marathon into before you started going a bit mad and/or throwing up all over your timing chip?

For example, 26.2 miles is roughly equivalent to 2700 laps of an average-sized kitchen. As well as making yourself dizzy, it’s difficult to achieve a PB when you stop at the biscuit tin every other lap.

Combine the two, and you have a bloke in a vest sicking up jammie dodgers onto their dog*. As images go, it’s not quite as inspirational as Mo Farah winning the Olympic 10000m.

*Google image search, you’ve let me down.

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13 thoughts on “Dizzy rascal

  1. I’d keep looking. Laps are hideous. I’m running the Oakley 20 mile race on Sunday, which is a 12 then an 8 mile lap. Going part the start at 12 miles was terrible last year. Milton Keynes was a surprisingly nice course.

    • yeah, in my limited experience a great crowd does make a huge difference. It’s almost like magic, really carries you along.

  2. Laps sound bad – imagine if your ten mile long slow run was to go out your front door, to the end of your street, left, up the back back past the back of your house, left and back to your front door. Repeat. You brain would escape through your ear and quite rightly go and watch you from the lounge window as you drooled your way past, tongue lolling with the effort of counting.

    I’m more of an out-and-back or one-time-circuit fella. I’ll take a second lap if there’s nothing else for it – out local parkrun is two laps, and I’ve kept my cool so far.

    Also, imagine the organisers are poor at counting – you’ll suspect they are at some point – recipe for “it IS twelve, I tell you” tantrums.

  3. Laps would be horrendous. I think there is one in Kent at a newly built cycle park that consists of something like 17 laps!! No thanks!! You’d be getting lapped every 4 laps, and that would be seriously demotivating!!!

  4. Yikes, I agree with all of the above. Laps sound horrible! If you fancy changing your stats to 30-ish female, the Manchester bib is all yours, just lemme know. 🙂

      • I’m having to admit to myself that there’s no way I’ll be able to… 😦 Been out with an inflamed patella tendon and haven’t run in at least a month! So if you want my place, it’s all yours!

  5. Soul destroying! It was bad enough doing 3 laps of Pitsford Reservoir for the long run but 12 laps of anything sound horrendous. I struggle with more than about 4 laps of a TRACK!

  6. Pff! Those guys are just scared of the lap-monster! I’d probably be inclined to select a race with laps because:

    1. It’s easier to keep an even pace
    2. You know the hard and easier bits of a lap (no surprises)
    3. Family and friends will literally get bored of seeing your sweaty face – rather than barely seeing you
    4. You can stash gel and drink easily and don’t have to carry it/wait for ages for the next
    5. If you can put up with multi-laps then mentally you could probably withstand SAS interrogation
    6. If for some reason you DNF it’s not a humiliating wait for the sweeper

    Get it done. Lap that ass.

    • Wow, a very persuasive argument there. If I weren’t a marathon virgin I think I’d be swayed, but is certainly give multi-lap routes a go on distances I’m already comfortable with.

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